The Dangers of Sweetened Beverages in the African Diaspora

The Dangers of Sweetened Beverages in the African Diaspora

Saturday 12 June de 17:00 à 18:30

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Seminar on the potentially deadly impact of sweet drinks in the African diaspora, plus solutions and advice on diabetes, obesity and NCD's

This event is organised by Black History Walks in conjunction with the Sarah Parker Remond Centre at University College London

“The scientific, medical, and public health communities all agree that the negative effects of sugar-sweetened beverages on weight gain, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and some cancers are of great concern. The Ministry of Health recognizes this concern and is in the process of developing a sugar-sweetened beverage policy that will include interventions to reduce the consumption of SSBs in the Federation. Meanwhile, we are encouraging the general public to ‘Rethink Your Drink’ by paying close attention to the sugar content in the drinks you consume by actively reading the nutrition labels and drinking more water.”

Dr Marissa Carty, Non Communicable Diseases Coordinator at the Ministry of Health, St Kitts-Nevis

Across the Caribbean there are major problems with non communicable diseases (NCDs) , obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and cancer .These issues were highlighted by Professor Hilary Beckles in his 2013 speech on reparations which recently went viral and can be seen below. Similar health concerns can also be found throughout the African diaspora. From Barbados to the Bahamas various countries are taking radical steps to reduce the damage caused by sweet drinks and unhealthy but popular foods. There is often entrenched opposition from vested local interests and multi national corporations who practice different standards in Africa and the Caribbean than in Europe.

This online talk with Q&A will feature speakers from Lake Health and Well Being who will cover the following topics:

  • The challenge of Sweetened Beverages and its links to obesity and NCDs in the Caribbean
  • Barriers to progress: Industry interference
  • Solutions, campaigns and examples of success
  • Question and answer session and educational resources

Speakers include:

  • Francine Charles Programme Manager, The Heart and Stroke Foundation, Barbados
  • Abi Begho, Founder and Director of Lake Health and Well Being
  • Isalean Phillip, Advocacy & Research Officer, Lake Health & Wellbeing,
  • Rachel Morrison, Caribbean Country Coordinator, Global Health Advocacy Incubator

This is an online event at 6.00pm UK/GMT time. Please check junk mail for link once registered.

Look out for our new book Black History Walks in London Volume 1 from Jacaranda Books

Other coming events from Black History Walks www.blackhistorywalks.co.uk

  • Black History River Cruise
  • Anti Racism as Politics with Professor Paul Gilroy
  • Fibroids and reproductive health: new research from the Caribbean
  • Jim Kelly, Kung Fu and Black British Civil Rights
  • 1968 Race Relations Act and the legacy of Black Lawyers
  • American Human Rights history, do Black Lives Matter ?
  • African Superheroes Day
  • Ultraviolence Black deaths in British police custody. Ken Fero
  • Coded Bias: Racism disguised in computer programming
  • The Gentrification of Peckham and Black Urban removal worldwide
  • The British Black Panther Movement interviews
  • 19th Century Superheroine Sarah Parker Remond

About the Lake Foundation

Lake Health and Wellbeing is a registered NGO (Non Governmental Organisation) headquartered in St Kitts and Nevis that aims to improve the health and wellbeing of the local, regional and online community through research, Public Health interventions, events, campaigns and by offering Public Health support services to small organisations. https://lakehealthandwellbeing.com/

About the Sarah Parker Remond Centre at U.C.L

The University College London Sarah Parker Remond Centre for the Study of Racism and Racialisation explores the impact of racism - scientific, metaphysical and cultural. Part of the UCL Institute of Advanced Studies, they work closely with many partners on-site to provide a focal point for scholarship, teaching and public engagement activities that are addressed to various problems of racial inequality and hierarchy.